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Article

During and After National Flood Safety Awareness Week

By HC Staff

Floods are one of the most common hazards in the United States, however not all floods are alike. Some floods develop slowly, while others such a flash floods, can develop in just a few minutes and without visible signs of rain. Additionally, floods can be local, impacting a neighborhood or community, or very large, affecting entire river basins and multiple states.

 

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Flash floods can occur within a few minutes or hours of excessive rainfall, a dam or levee failure, or a sudden release of water held by an ice jam. Flash floods often have a dangerous wall of roaring water carrying rocks, mud and other debris. Overland flooding, the most common type of flooding event typically occurs when waterways such as rivers or streams overflow their banks as a result of rainwater or a possible levee breach and cause flooding in surrounding areas. It can also occur when rainfall or snowmelt exceeds the capacity of underground pipes, or the capacity of streets and drains designed to carry flood water away from urban areas.

High Water

Be aware of flood hazards no matter where you live or work, but especially if you are in low-lying areas, near water, behind a levee or downstream from a dam. Even very small streams, gullies, creeks, culverts, dry streambeds or low-lying ground that appear harmless in dry weather can flood.

If you have experienced a flood and need help cleaning up, consider calling certified professionals such as those recommended by The Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC).

 

National Flood Safety Awareness Week

 

 

For more information on National Flood Safety Awareness Week, visit

 

 

http://www.floodsafety.noaa.gov/.

 

 

 

 

The Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) is an ANSI-accredited standards setting body for the flooring inspection, floor covering and specialized fabric cleaning and disaster restoration industries. Organized in 1972, IICRC currently represents more than 5,700 Certified Firms and 54,000 Certified Technicians in 22 countries. The IICRC, with participation from the entire industry, sets standards for inspection, cleaning and disaster restoration. IICRC does not own schools, employ instructors, produce training materials, or promote specific product brands, cleaning methods or systems. It approves schools and instructors that meet the criteria established by IICRC. IICRC also serves as a consumer referral source for Certified Firms and Inspectors.

Here are some articles that may also be helpful:

http://www.housekeepingchannel.com/a_1031-Risks_of_Water_Fire_and_Mold_Damage
http://www.healthyhouseinstitute.com/a_1002-Keeping_Food_Safe_During_an_Emergency
http://www.healthyhouseinstitute.com/a_1148-How_Do_Water_Damage_Restorers_Use_Infrared_Cameras

 

During and After National Flood Safety Awareness Week:  Created on March 17th, 2012.  Last Modified on January 21st, 2014

 

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